Protagonist - Definition and Examples | LitCharts

 

examples of protagonist in literature

Jan 21,  · Definition of a Protagonist. A protagonist is the main character in a work of literature or movie. With many characters surrounding the protagonist, finding that main character can sometimes be. Dec 10,  · Examples in Literature In movies as well as in works of literature, the protagonist may be hard to identify, especially if you're looking for a heroic character. Becky Sharpe is one of the main protagonists in "Vanity Fair," but she's extremely flawed. A protagonist is the main character in a text. While the protagonist is often the "good guy," that does not have to be the case. The protagonist can be a bad person.. A protagonist in a story has some type of problem or conflict. In many stories, the protagonist has an antagonist-someone or something that is in conflict with the protagonist.


Protagonist Examples: Creating Memorable Main Characters | Now Novel


In such a story, the different narrative threads should all get tied together in the end. So many of our heroic protagonists are based in some way on this archetypal hero whose tremendous strength allowed him to slay monsters that no one else could defeat.

In modern stories, our heroes tend to be more complicated than the classical monster-slayer — not always, though!

Plenty of modern super heroes can be seen doing battle with giant, destructive monsters. Villain protagonists are often created by re-telling classic stories from the perspective of the villain.

In the story, Grendel starts out as merely misunderstood, not evil. Years of abuse, however, ultimately turn him into the monster we see in Beowulf.

Bilbo Baggins from The Hobbit is a good example of a supporting protagonist. The major events surround Thorin Oakenshield, the exiled Dwarf King, examples of protagonist in literature, trying to reclaim examples of protagonist in literature kingdom. Most protagonists are heroes. The hero is morally upstanding, and usually some kind of leader, either of a small ragtag band or a massive army.

Either way, a hero is morally right, and generally less in need of development than other characters. An anti-hero is one who has characteristics completely opposed to those of an ordinary hero. An anti-hero may be in a moral grey area, or make us feel uneasy in some way, but such characters are ultimately redeemed.

For example, the protagonist of American Psycho is the serial killer Patrick Bateman, whose actions are in no way justified by the examples of protagonist in literature. Most protagonists are major characters in their own right — whether they are heroes, anti-heroes or villains, they are central to all the action that takes place in the story, examples of protagonist in literature.

Occasionally, though, a writer will experiment with a supporting protagonist, or a main character who is more peripheral to the events. For example, the most important person at the White House is clearly President Obama. Protagonists give the audience someone to focus on and lend narrative unity to the story. And if the protagonist is boring, then the story will not be compelling and readers will not care what happens next.

In general, the protagonist is the person that the audience relates to — we imagine ourselves in her shoes, suffer with her failures, and exult in her successes. Of course, this is definitely not the case with a villain protagonist.

In those cases, we want the protagonist to lose in the end. The protagonist shifts somewhat in J. However, in the later books Frodo parts ways from the rest of the Fellowship, and for several books there are at least two distinct plotlines: one examples of protagonist in literature Frodo as the protagonist, and the other with Aragorn as the protagonist.

Sherlock Holmes straddles the line between hero and anti-hero. He uses cocaine, which makes him seem somewhat edgy and dangerous to modern audiences although Victorian readers would not have been fazed by this. In addition, he sometimes oversteps his role as a detective by letting perpetrators go free if he sympathizes with their actions, and threatening them with death rather than arrest. Watson, in these books, examples of protagonist in literature, is the narrator, and, some readers would argue, the protagonist as well — but at most he is a supporting.

The two classic superheroes, Superman and Captain America, are so influential as heroes that they have begun to seem boring and generic to many audiences. They are morally uncomplicated, fearless, and possess all the qualities of strength and leadership that we expect from a classic hero. As the comic book world has grown increasingly cynical and ironic, these characters have decreased in popularity and writers have begun to subvert their heroism in various ways.

For example, recent depictions of Captain America have shown him as an egotistical meddler; someone who struggles to be a leader and often earns resentment from his followers rather than loyalty.

The Star Wars movies exemplify many of the tropes seen in this article. In the original trilogy, the protagonist is Luke Skywalker, a pretty typical hero.

The deuteragonist, however, is Han Solo, who hovers somewhere in between a hero and an anti-hero. Eric Cartman from South Park often comes in as a villain protagonist. In Moby-Dickfor example, the narrator is Ishmael. By the end of the book, Captain Ahab is clearly the protagonist, although Ishmael is still the narrator. Does this make more sense? Typically, this is the villain, but not always. Note that not every story has an antagonist — in some stories, the protagonist is struggling against circumstance, natural disasters, or some other impersonal force.

In these stories, the source examples of protagonist in literature conflict is not an antagonist. A secondary main character, less important than the protagonist but still essential to the story, is called a deuteragonist.

These characters are not protagonists in any sense — they are not at the center of the events, nor are they at the center of the storyas a supporting protagonist would be. Deuteragonists can also be heroes, villains, or anti-heroes, just like protagonists. List of Terms Action. Ad Hominem. Alter Ego. APA Citation. Comic Relief. Deus ex machina. Double Entendre. Dramatic irony. Extended Metaphor. Fairy Tale. Figures of Speech. Literary Device, examples of protagonist in literature.

Pathetic Fallacy. Plot Twist. Point of View. Red Herring. Rhetorical Device. Rhetorical Question. Science Fiction. Self-Fulfilling Prophecy. Turning Point. Urban Legend. Literary Terms.

 

Protagonist - Examples and Definition of Protagonist

 

examples of protagonist in literature

 

Dec 10,  · Examples in Literature In movies as well as in works of literature, the protagonist may be hard to identify, especially if you're looking for a heroic character. Becky Sharpe is one of the main protagonists in "Vanity Fair," but she's extremely flawed. A protagonist is the main character in a text. While the protagonist is often the "good guy," that does not have to be the case. The protagonist can be a bad person.. A protagonist in a story has some type of problem or conflict. In many stories, the protagonist has an antagonist-someone or something that is in conflict with the protagonist. Jan 21,  · Definition of a Protagonist. A protagonist is the main character in a work of literature or movie. With many characters surrounding the protagonist, finding that main character can sometimes be.